A Vindication of the Capacity of the Negro Race for Self-Government, and Civilized Progress, as Demonstrated by Historical Events of the Haytian Revolution: And the Subsequent Acts of That People Since Their National Independence

James Theodore Holly. 1857.

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James Theodore Holly was an ordained Episcopalian priest, who spent much of his life in Haiti and urged other African Americans to emigrate there. Faustin I participated as a youth in the Haitian Revolution in 1803 and later ruled Haiti from 1849–1859.

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Holly delivered this lecture to the Literary Society of Colored Young Men in New Haven, Connecticut.

Image of A Vindication of the Capacity of the Negro Race for Self-Government, and Civilized Progress, as Demonstrated by Historical Events of the Haytian Revolution: And the Subsequent Acts of That People Since Their National Independence
Image of A Vindication of the Capacity of the Negro Race for Self-Government, and Civilized Progress, as Demonstrated by Historical Events of the Haytian Revolution: And the Subsequent Acts of That People Since Their National Independence
Metadata Details
Item Type Book
Title A Vindication of the Capacity of the Negro Race for Self-Government, and Civilized Progress, as Demonstrated by Historical Events of the Haytian Revolution: And the Subsequent Acts of That People Since Their National Independence
Short Title Self-Government for the Negro Race, 1857
Place of Publication New Haven
Publisher William H. Stanley
Creator James Theodore Holly
Publication Date 1857
Number of Pages Frontispiece, title page, and pp. 4–6
Call Number F 972 .42
Location General Collections 2nd floor