Agrippa’s De occulta philosophia

Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim. From Henrici Cor. Agrippae ab Nettesheym, De occulta philosophia libri III. : Quibus accesserunt, spurius Agrippae liber De ceremonijs magicis. Heptameron Petri de Albano. Ratio compendiaria magiae naturalis, ex Plinio desumpta. Disputatio de fascinationibus, 1567.

Image of Agrippa’s De occulta philosophia

The second chapter of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettescheim’s sixteenth-century book On Occult Philosophy begins with a definition of magic, calling it the most sublime part of natural philosophy.

Image of Agrippa’s De occulta philosophia

The second chapter of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettescheim’s sixteenth-century book On Occult Philosophy begins with a definition of magic, calling it the most sublime part of natural philosophy.

What Magic is, What are the Parts thereof, and How the Professors therefore must be Qualified.

Magic is a faculty of wonderful virtue, full of the most important mysteries, and containing the most profound contemplation of hidden secrets along with a knowledge of all of Nature – including its essence, power, quality, substance, and virtue. Magic instructs us on how things differ and agree with each other in order to produce wondrous effects by uniting the virtues of things through the application of them one to the other, as well as to lesser things affected by them, and joining and knitting them together by the powers and virtues of the higher beings. Magic is the most perfect and chief science, a sacred and sublime kind of philosophy, and lastly the absolute perfection of all philosophy.

Image of Agrippa’s De occulta philosophia

The second chapter of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettescheim’s sixteenth-century book On Occult Philosophy begins with a definition of magic, calling it the most sublime part of natural philosophy.

What Magic is, What are the Parts thereof, and How the Professors therefore must be Qualified.

Magic is a faculty of wonderful virtue, full of the most important mysteries, and containing the most profound contemplation of hidden secrets along with a knowledge of all of Nature – including its essence, power, quality, substance, and virtue. Magic instructs us on how things differ and agree with each other in order to produce wondrous effects by uniting the virtues of things through the application of them one to the other, as well as to lesser things affected by them, and joining and knitting them together by the powers and virtues of the higher beings. Magic is the most perfect and chief science, a sacred and sublime kind of philosophy, and lastly the absolute perfection of all philosophy.

Metadata Details
Item Type Book
Title Agrippa’s De occulta philosophia
Publication Title Henrici Cor. Agrippae ab Nettesheym, De occulta philosophia libri III. : Quibus accesserunt, spurius Agrippae liber De ceremonijs magicis. Heptameron Petri de Albano. Ratio compendiaria magiae naturalis, ex Plinio desumpta. Disputatio de fascinationibus
Creator Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim
Publication Date 1567
Call Number Case B 247 .016
Location Special Collections