Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

D. Quélus. 1719.

Image of Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

Quélus lived in the French American islands for fifteen years. While there, he carefully observed cacao as a plant and product. The book contains his diagrams as well as textual descriptions, medical virtues, and culinary and medical preparations.

Image of Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

Quélus lived in the French American islands for fifteen years. While there, he carefully observed cacao as a plant and product. The book contains his diagrams as well as textual descriptions, medical virtues, and culinary and medical preparations.

Plate 1: Translation of Text (by Sarah Kernan)

“1. A cacao pod depicted at approximately one third of its natural size. 2. Half of this same pod cut across. 3. A bean of its natural size. 4. The same bean hulled from its outer skin. 5. Small cacao pod at one month. 6. Cacao flowers in bud and blooming.”

Image of Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

Quélus lived in the French American islands for fifteen years. While there, he carefully observed cacao as a plant and product. The book contains his diagrams as well as textual descriptions, medical virtues, and culinary and medical preparations.

“The Indians, who have used this Drink time out of mind, prepared it without any great Art; they roasted their Kernels in earthen Pots, then ground them between two Stones, diluted them with hot Water, and season’d them with Pimento: those who were more curious, added Achiota to give it a Colour, and Attolla to augment its Substance. All these things joined together, gave to the Composition so strange a Look, and so odd a Taste, that a Spanish Soldier said, it was more fit to be thrown to Hogs, than presented to Men; and that he could never have accustomed himself to it, if the want of Wine had not forced him to it, that he might not always be obliged to drink nothing but Water.

The Spaniards taught by the Mexicans, and convinced by their own Experience, that this Drink, as rustick as it appeared to them, nevertheless yielded very wholesome Nourishment; try’d to make it more agreeable by the Addition of Sugar, some Oriental Spices, and Things that grew there, which it will be needless to mention, because the Names of them are not so much as known here, and because of so many Ingredients, there is none continued down to us but Vanilla; in like manner, that Cinnamon is the only Spice which has had general Approbation, and remains in the Composition of Chocolate.

Vanilla is a Cod of a brown Colour and delicate Smell; it is flatter and longer than our [French] Beans, it contains a luscious Substance, full of little black shining Grains. They must be chosen fresh, full, and well grown, and care must be taken that they are not smeared with Balsam, nor put in a moist Place.

The agreeable Smell, and exquisite Taste that they communicate to Chocolate, have prodigiusly recommended it; but long Experience having taught that it heats very much, its Use is become less frequent, and those who prefer their Health more than pleasing their Senses, abstain from it entirely. In Spain and Italy, Chocolate prepared without Vanilla, is called at present Chocolate of Health; and in the French Islands of America, where Vanilla is neither scarce nor dear, as in Europe, they do not use it at all, though they consume as much Chocolate there as in any other Place in the World.”

Translation from R. Brookes, The Natural History of Chocolate (London: Printed for D. Browne, 1725), 63–65.

Image of Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

Quélus lived in the French American islands for fifteen years. While there, he carefully observed cacao as a plant and product. The book contains his diagrams as well as textual descriptions, medical virtues, and culinary and medical preparations.

“The Indians, who have used this Drink time out of mind, prepared it without any great Art; they roasted their Kernels in earthen Pots, then ground them between two Stones, diluted them with hot Water, and season’d them with Pimento: those who were more curious, added Achiota to give it a Colour, and Attolla to augment its Substance. All these things joined together, gave to the Composition so strange a Look, and so odd a Taste, that a Spanish Soldier said, it was more fit to be thrown to Hogs, than presented to Men; and that he could never have accustomed himself to it, if the want of Wine had not forced him to it, that he might not always be obliged to drink nothing but Water.

The Spaniards taught by the Mexicans, and convinced by their own Experience, that this Drink, as rustick as it appeared to them, nevertheless yielded very wholesome Nourishment; try’d to make it more agreeable by the Addition of Sugar, some Oriental Spices, and Things that grew there, which it will be needless to mention, because the Names of them are not so much as known here, and because of so many Ingredients, there is none continued down to us but Vanilla; in like manner, that Cinnamon is the only Spice which has had general Approbation, and remains in the Composition of Chocolate.

Vanilla is a Cod of a brown Colour and delicate Smell; it is flatter and longer than our [French] Beans, it contains a luscious Substance, full of little black shining Grains. They must be chosen fresh, full, and well grown, and care must be taken that they are not smeared with Balsam, nor put in a moist Place.

The agreeable Smell, and exquisite Taste that they communicate to Chocolate, have prodigiusly recommended it; but long Experience having taught that it heats very much, its Use is become less frequent, and those who prefer their Health more than pleasing their Senses, abstain from it entirely. In Spain and Italy, Chocolate prepared without Vanilla, is called at present Chocolate of Health; and in the French Islands of America, where Vanilla is neither scarce nor dear, as in Europe, they do not use it at all, though they consume as much Chocolate there as in any other Place in the World.”

Translation from R. Brookes, The Natural History of Chocolate (London: Printed for D. Browne, 1725), 63–65.

Image of Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

Quélus lived in the French American islands for fifteen years. While there, he carefully observed cacao as a plant and product. The book contains his diagrams as well as textual descriptions, medical virtues, and culinary and medical preparations.

“The Indians, who have used this Drink time out of mind, prepared it without any great Art; they roasted their Kernels in earthen Pots, then ground them between two Stones, diluted them with hot Water, and season’d them with Pimento: those who were more curious, added Achiota to give it a Colour, and Attolla to augment its Substance. All these things joined together, gave to the Composition so strange a Look, and so odd a Taste, that a Spanish Soldier said, it was more fit to be thrown to Hogs, than presented to Men; and that he could never have accustomed himself to it, if the want of Wine had not forced him to it, that he might not always be obliged to drink nothing but Water.

The Spaniards taught by the Mexicans, and convinced by their own Experience, that this Drink, as rustick as it appeared to them, nevertheless yielded very wholesome Nourishment; try’d to make it more agreeable by the Addition of Sugar, some Oriental Spices, and Things that grew there, which it will be needless to mention, because the Names of them are not so much as known here, and because of so many Ingredients, there is none continued down to us but Vanilla; in like manner, that Cinnamon is the only Spice which has had general Approbation, and remains in the Composition of Chocolate.

Vanilla is a Cod of a brown Colour and delicate Smell; it is flatter and longer than our [French] Beans, it contains a luscious Substance, full of little black shining Grains. They must be chosen fresh, full, and well grown, and care must be taken that they are not smeared with Balsam, nor put in a moist Place.

The agreeable Smell, and exquisite Taste that they communicate to Chocolate, have prodigiusly recommended it; but long Experience having taught that it heats very much, its Use is become less frequent, and those who prefer their Health more than pleasing their Senses, abstain from it entirely. In Spain and Italy, Chocolate prepared without Vanilla, is called at present Chocolate of Health; and in the French Islands of America, where Vanilla is neither scarce nor dear, as in Europe, they do not use it at all, though they consume as much Chocolate there as in any other Place in the World.”

Translation from R. Brookes, The Natural History of Chocolate (London: Printed for D. Browne, 1725), 63–65.

Image of Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

Quélus lived in the French American islands for fifteen years. While there, he carefully observed cacao as a plant and product. The book contains his diagrams as well as textual descriptions, medical virtues, and culinary and medical preparations.

“The Indians, who have used this Drink time out of mind, prepared it without any great Art; they roasted their Kernels in earthen Pots, then ground them between two Stones, diluted them with hot Water, and season’d them with Pimento: those who were more curious, added Achiota to give it a Colour, and Attolla to augment its Substance. All these things joined together, gave to the Composition so strange a Look, and so odd a Taste, that a Spanish Soldier said, it was more fit to be thrown to Hogs, than presented to Men; and that he could never have accustomed himself to it, if the want of Wine had not forced him to it, that he might not always be obliged to drink nothing but Water.

The Spaniards taught by the Mexicans, and convinced by their own Experience, that this Drink, as rustick as it appeared to them, nevertheless yielded very wholesome Nourishment; try’d to make it more agreeable by the Addition of Sugar, some Oriental Spices, and Things that grew there, which it will be needless to mention, because the Names of them are not so much as known here, and because of so many Ingredients, there is none continued down to us but Vanilla; in like manner, that Cinnamon is the only Spice which has had general Approbation, and remains in the Composition of Chocolate.

Vanilla is a Cod of a brown Colour and delicate Smell; it is flatter and longer than our [French] Beans, it contains a luscious Substance, full of little black shining Grains. They must be chosen fresh, full, and well grown, and care must be taken that they are not smeared with Balsam, nor put in a moist Place.

The agreeable Smell, and exquisite Taste that they communicate to Chocolate, have prodigiusly recommended it; but long Experience having taught that it heats very much, its Use is become less frequent, and those who prefer their Health more than pleasing their Senses, abstain from it entirely. In Spain and Italy, Chocolate prepared without Vanilla, is called at present Chocolate of Health; and in the French Islands of America, where Vanilla is neither scarce nor dear, as in Europe, they do not use it at all, though they consume as much Chocolate there as in any other Place in the World.”

Translation from R. Brookes, The Natural History of Chocolate (London: Printed for D. Browne, 1725), 63–65.

Image of Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

Quélus lived in the French American islands for fifteen years. While there, he carefully observed cacao as a plant and product. The book contains his diagrams as well as textual descriptions, medical virtues, and culinary and medical preparations.

“5. The Use of Milk is a specifick Remedy for the Cure of several Distempers, but by Misfortune there are but few Stomachs that can bear it, and several Methods have been try’d to find out Help for this Inconvenience. Without troubling myself to mention or examine them, will it not be an easy and natural Method, to hinder the Milk from curdling on the Stomach, to pour a hot Dish of Chocolate upon a Pint or Quart of Milk? The butirous Parts of the Milk and Chocolate, are in reality analogous to each other, and very proper to be united for the same Purpose; and what is bitter and alkaline in the Chocolate, ought necessarily to hinder the curdling of the Milk in the Stomach. It is easy to confirm by Experience the Reasoning upon this sort of Chocolated Milk.”

Translation from R. Brookes, The Natural History of Chocolate (London: Printed for D. Browne, 1725), 74.

Image of Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités

Quélus lived in the French American islands for fifteen years. While there, he carefully observed cacao as a plant and product. The book contains his diagrams as well as textual descriptions, medical virtues, and culinary and medical preparations.

“5. The Use of Milk is a specifick Remedy for the Cure of several Distempers, but by Misfortune there are but few Stomachs that can bear it, and several Methods have been try’d to find out Help for this Inconvenience. Without troubling myself to mention or examine them, will it not be an easy and natural Method, to hinder the Milk from curdling on the Stomach, to pour a hot Dish of Chocolate upon a Pint or Quart of Milk? The butirous Parts of the Milk and Chocolate, are in reality analogous to each other, and very proper to be united for the same Purpose; and what is bitter and alkaline in the Chocolate, ought necessarily to hinder the curdling of the Milk in the Stomach. It is easy to confirm by Experience the Reasoning upon this sort of Chocolated Milk.”

Translation from R. Brookes, The Natural History of Chocolate (London: Printed for D. Browne, 1725), 74.

Metadata Details
Item Type Book
Title Histoire naturelle du cacao, et du sucre, divisée en deux traités
Creator D. Quélus
Publication Date 1719
Language French
Call Number Ayer 8.9 .B7 Q3 1719
Location Special Collections